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2.3.1 Safeguarding Children and Young People who go Missing from Home and Care


Contents

1. Introduction
2. Definition of a Missing Child or Young Person
3. Reporting a Child who is Missing or Absent
4. Dealing with Children who are Reported Missing or Absent
5. Referral Pathway for Children who are Reported Missing or Absent
6. Action following the Child or Young Person being found
  6.1 Safe and Well Checks
  6.2 When a Child Returns Home
  6.3 Screening Information about a Child after the Child has been found
7. Independent Return Home Interviews
8. Children who Repeatedly Run Away or require additional support through Multi-Agency Meetings
  8.1 Multi-Agency / Strategy Meetings
  8.2 Attendance at Meetings
  8.3 Areas to Consider in Strategy / Multi-Agency Meeting
9. Looked after Children
  9.1 Care Planning and Review
  9.2 Rotherham Looked After Children Placed Out of Borough
  9.3 Looked After Children from Another Area Placed in Rotherham
  9.4 Children’s Home Staff and Foster Carers
  9.5 Reducing the Risk of Looked After Children Running Away
10. Children who Go Missing but are Not Reported to the Police
11. Multi-Agency Risk Management Panel (MARP)
  Appendix 1: Referral Pathway Flowchart for Children and Young People who are missing from Care or Home
  Appendix 2: Missing Screening Tool


1. Introduction

Children and young people who are missing from home or care may be particularly vulnerable to harm when they are missing. Running away is often symptomatic of wider problems in a child or young person’s life, but whatever the reason, one thing is clear: children who decide to run away are likely to be unhappy, vulnerable and potentially at risk of harm. It is important through the identification, notification and risk assessment process, to ensure that services are targeted at locating those young people who are particularly vulnerable, to understand their issues and perspectives and to work with them and their family to deal with the issues that led to them running away in the first place.

Children may run away from a problem, such as abuse or neglect at home, or to somewhere they want to be. These are called “push” and “pull” factors. They may have been coerced to run away by someone else. Whatever the reason, it is thought that approximately 25 % of children and young people that go missing are at risk of serious harm. There are particular concerns about the links between children running away and the risks of sexual exploitation. Missing children may also be vulnerable to other forms of exploitation, to violent crime, gang exploitation, or to drug and alcohol misuse. There are established links between children who are reported missing from care or home and those missing from education. This may increase the risks to the child as the school is unable to monitor their wellbeing.

Although looked after children are particularly vulnerable when they go missing, the majority of children who go missing are not looked after, and go missing from their family home. They can face the same risks as a child missing from local authority care. The same measures are often required to protect both groups of children.


2. Definition of a Missing Child or Young Person

The Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO, now called College of Policing) issued guidance (2013, updated in 2015) about working with missing persons. This included a definition to distinguish between people who are considered “missing” and ‘absent’:

Missing

  • Anyone whose whereabouts cannot be established whatever the circumstances of disappearance and where the circumstances are out of character, or the context suggests the person may be a subject of crime or at risk of harm to themselves or another.

Absent

  • Missing children will be categorised as ‘Absent’ if they are not at a place where they are supposed to be and there is no apparent risk.

Absent cases will not be ignored by the police. They will not be actively looking for the child or young person but they will continue to monitor and review the case and if there is a change to the circumstances that increases the level of risk then they may be escalated to ‘Missing’ status.

The focus from the police should be on achieving a satisfactory outcome for the missing child and making this decision promptly. Such decisions need to be based on common sense, reasonableness but, most importantly effectiveness with the emphasis placed upon on the welfare of the missing child above all other considerations.

The decision regarding whether a child is classified as “Missing” or “Absent” ultimately lies with South Yorkshire Police. However, the Local Authority, Health, Education and the Voluntary Sector can challenge any decision through the RLSCB Practice Resolution Protocol.


3. Reporting a Child who is Missing or Absent

Parents, carers and anyone concerned about the whereabouts of a child or young person should contact the police when:

  • They do not know where the child is and are concerned for his/her welfare and safety;
  • Factors such as age, understanding of the child and health (physical and mental, including risk of self-harm or suicidal ideation) issues should be considered. Additional known risk factors such as links with child sex exploitation, criminality, adults who pose a risk to the child, known friends of acquaintances who could put the child at risk of significant harm etc. should also be considered.

Parents, carers and anyone concerned about the whereabouts of a child or young person should not contact the police immediately when:

  • The child is not at a place where they are expected to be, for example, they may have a set time to return home and are late, have said that they are visiting somewhere but they haven’t and the parent or carer is not concerned they are at risk of significant harm.

In these circumstances, the parent/s, carers or foster carers or residential care workers should make reasonable efforts and enquiries to locate the child.

After efforts and enquiries have been exhausted and there is now a shared concern for the welfare of the child the police should be called on 101.

In cases where the child is classed as being absent the parent / person with Parental Responsibility or residential care worker or foster carer will continue to liaise with the Police until the child is located and/or returned.

When reporting a child as missing, it is good practice to have the following information to hand:

  • Personal information of the child: age, appearance, health issues, what the child was wearing when they went missing etc;
  • Names, addresses and telephone numbers of friends, family, acquaintances or other people the child may be with;
  • Places s/he frequents;
  • Time the child went missing or was last seen and by whom;
  • Previous missing incidents;
  • Any risk of harm to the child including risk of child sexual exploitation;
  • Any risk of harm the child may do to others;
  • Other risk factors or concerns.

Have a recent photograph of the child.

If the child is looked after and aged over 9 years, the social worker should prepare a “Trigger Plan” when they become looked after. If a child does not have a “Trigger Plan” and is reported missing then a “Trigger Plan” must be produced. For more information see Section 9, Looked After Children.

The Trigger Plan outlines all of the above and is made available to police to assist in finding the child. The document should be updated at every review or when concerns emerge. When a looked after child is placed out of Rotherham, a copy of the “Trigger Plan” is sent to the host authority – for more information see Section 9.2 Rotherham Looked After Children Placed out of Borough.


4. Dealing with Children who are Reported Missing or Absent

South Yorkshire Police will prioritise all incidents of children categorised as ‘missing’ from home or care as medium or high risk. Where a child is categorised as ‘absent’, the details will be recorded by the police, who will also agree review times and any ongoing actions with child’s family, carer or responsible local authority.

HIGH RISK

A missing child incident would be prioritised as ‘high risk’ where:

  • The risk posed is immediate and there are substantial grounds for believing that the subject is in danger through their own vulnerability; or
  • The child may have been the victim of a serious crime;
  • The risk posed is immediate and there are substantial grounds for believing that the public is in danger.

This category requires the immediate deployment of police resources. An immediate referral should be made to CYPS MASH.

A member of the Crime Unit senior management team or similar command level must be involved in the examination of initial enquiry lines and approval of appropriate staffing levels. Such cases should lead to the appointment of an Investigating Officer and possibly a Senior Investigating Officer and a Police Search Adviser. There should be a press/media strategy and/or close contact with outside agencies. Family support should be put in place. The National Crime agency Missing Persons Bureau should be notified of the case without undue delay. Child Exploitation and Online Protection (CEOP) Missing Kids should also be notified.

MEDIUM RISK

A missing child incident would be prioritised as ‘medium risk’ where the risk posed is likely to place the child in danger or they are a threat to themselves or others. This category requires an active and measured response by police and other agencies in order to trace the missing child and support the person reporting: a proactive investigation and search in accordance with the circumstances to locate the missing child as soon as possible.

ABSENT

Where a child is categorised as ‘absent’, the details will be recorded by the police, who will also agree review times and any on-going actions with child’s family, carer (including foster carer and residential care workers) or responsible Local Authority (if the child is from another area but placed in Rotherham).

The case will remain the subject of regular review, particularly in the light of new information and changes in circumstances.


5. Referral Pathway for Children who are Reported Missing or Absent

For more information see Referral Pathway Flowchart for Children and Young People who are missing from Care or Home.

In all circumstances when a child is classed as ‘Missing’ or ‘Absent’ the police will refer the child by sending a ‘missing / absent email notification’ to the Multi Agency Safeguarding Hub (MASH) which is accessed by the Missing Team.

All agency practitioners who become aware that a child is missing or has been missing from home or care should encourage the person with Parental Responsibility or carer to contact the Police to report the child as missing and check that this has been done. The practitioner should contact the police and report the child missing if the parent/carer is unwilling to do so. The practitioner should then contact MASH and complete a Multi Agency Referral Form (MARF).

Throughout the missing episode, the police are responsible for ongoing enquiries, risk assessment and proportionate actions.

In the event of a continuing missing episode good communication and close cooperation is essential to ensure that any significant concerns are identified and appropriate safeguarding action is taken.

When the Out of Hours’ Team receives notification that a child or young person is missing, they will take the following action:

  • Assess whether the concerns are such that an immediate social work response is necessary;
  • If an immediate social work response is not necessary then the notification will be forwarded to MASH and this will be picked up the next working day.

When a Looked After Child is reported missing to the Police, the Out of Hours service will need to be informed as soon as possible if the level of concern about the safety and welfare of the child is such that the children’s home staff or foster carer feels that an immediate social work response is necessary.

At the earliest opportunity the child’s social worker will be informed that the child has been reported as missing. This will be done electronically by the Missing Team during office hours and by the Out of Hours Team outside office hours. This is particularly important with regard to children who have been categorised as ‘Absent’ by the Police. For more information see Referring Safeguarding Concerns about Children Procedure.


6. Action following the Child or Young Person being found

South Yorkshire Police will send a notification to the Missing Team via MASH when the child has been found, detailing information about the circumstances and any relevant information from the safe and well checks.

6.1 Safe and Well Checks

Safe and well checks are carried out by the police as soon as possible after the child has returned. Their purpose is to check for any indications that the child has suffered harm, where and with whom they have been, and to give them an opportunity to disclose any offending by or against them. The safe and well checks provide an opportunity for the police to develop and share information / intelligence to prevent any risky behaviour and disrupt potential offenders. The information gathered by the police during the safe and well check should be shared with the social worker and MASH via the electronic notification to report the child has been found.

6.2 When a Child Returns Home

Research and reports over the past few years on children who go missing indicate that the arrangements for the return of the child are almost as important as the strategies to prevent missing incidents.

Children should be welcomed back and given time and space to recover.

When a Looked after Child either Missing or Absent returns then the residential home or foster carer will inform the social worker at the earliest opportunity. They will also inform the police of the return and any other professionals who need this information.

Children’s homes staff and foster carers will complete a missing person incident report (these can be found in the Rotherham Children’s Homes Procedures).

6.3 Screening Information about a Child after the Child has been found

The CSE/Missing Person’s Coordinator will screen all contacts sent by the police or other agency practitioners after the child has been reported found within one working day. If there is additional vulnerability identified for the child the case will be further screened by the Multi-Agency Safeguarding Hub (MASH) – for more information see Action Following Referral of Safeguarding Concerns Procedure, The MASH Process.

Every episode that a child is reported missing (regardless of frequency) should be assessed to determine if there is any action that should be taken to safeguard the child. If there is additional vulnerability identified for the child (i.e. risk indicators that they are at risk of sexual exploitation or self-harm etc) then action must be taken. It may be helpful to use the Missing Screening Tool and the CSE Screening Tool to assist in deciding whether or not to take further action.

The outcome of the contact may be the same as any other contact – for more information see Action Following Referral of Safeguarding Concerns Procedure, Initial MASH Response to Contacts.


7. Independent Return Home Interviews

The Children’s Society defines a Return Home Interview (RHI) as:

a conversation that a trained professional has with a young person following a running away episode. It aims to establish what has caused the young person to run away, what experiences and individuals the young person encountered while away and what could help resolve the issues that the child identifies. It is an effective way of identifying children at risk of significant harm. It helps reduce, and even prevent, further episodes of running away by helping children understand the risks of being away from their families and carers. It can also help disrupt sexual exploitation or abuse and provide evidence for prosecution.”

An Independent Return Home Interview will be conducted for every child who has been reported missing and has returned home. All RHIs will be conducted by the “Missing Team”, except for the EVOLVE Team who will conduct the Independent Return Home Interviews for children they are working with.

All Return Home Interviews must be conducted as soon as possible after the child has returned home and always within 72 hours.

The return home interview will:

  • Understand and try to address the reasons why the child ran away;
  • Help the child to feel safe and to understand that they have options to prevent repeat instances of them running away;
  • Provide the child with information on how to stay safe if they choose to run away again, including helpline numbers;
  • Identify and understand the child’s individual fears and anxieties;
  • Identify any safeguarding issues and ensure that these are immediately passed on to the allocated social worker if it is an open case, or to the MASH as a new contact – see Referring Safeguarding Concerns about Children Procedure. Identify any underlying issues that have led to the child to go missing, such as family relationship issues, domestic abuse, risk of sexual exploitation, etc;
  • Provide supportive measures which may prevent further absences;
  • Determine the wishes and feelings of the Looked After Child with regard to their placement if relevant;
  • Determine any issues that are troubling the child, such as not feeling happy with their care planning processes;
  • Record the details of any known people who they spent time with whilst missing;
  • Record the details of any addresses stayed at.

The Return Home Interview will be recorded on the proforma and attached to the child’s electronic case file as soon as possible after its completion. Any significant information gained from the RHI will be shared with the allocated social worker and the police where appropriate.


8. Children who Repeatedly Run Away or require additional support through Multi-Agency Meetings

Repeatedly going missing should not be viewed as a normal pattern of behaviour. If a child repeatedly goes missing or they have run away at least twice, the allocated worker should ensure a discussion is held with the child and their family or carers to offer further support and guidance.

If the child is not an open case, the CSE/Missing Person’s Coordinator will review the circumstances and decide if action should be taken.

Every episode that a child is reported missing (regardless of frequency and including the first time) should be assessed on its individual merits to determine if a multi-agency meeting should be held.

8.1 Multi-Agency / Strategy Meetings

The threshold for convening a multi-agency meeting will be triggered by any of the following circumstances:

  • A child who is reported missing or absent on three occasions within a month;
  • A child who is considered to be at risk of significant harm;
  • A child has not been traced/recovered within 48 hours;
  • A child who is considered vulnerable because of their young age (under 11) or history;
  • A child where there is additional vulnerability identified for the child (i.e. risk indicators that they are at risk of sexual exploitation or self-harm or in need of early help or child in need services).

If the child is at risk of significant harm, a Strategy Meeting must be convened under child protection procedures – for more information see Strategy Discussions / Meetings Procedure. The timeframe to convene the meeting should follow those procedures: A Strategy Meeting should take place within 48 hours and preferably within 24 hours of the initial referral or identification of concern, although the actual timing will be dependent upon the degree of perceived risk.

If the child is not considered to be at risk of significant harm but has additional needs, a multi-agency meeting should be held. This meeting should be held within 5 working days of the missing episode that triggered the need for the meeting.

If the child/young person is subject to a Child Protection Plan and is missing for over 48 hours a Review Child Protection Conference should be convened and held within 15 working days).

The following information applies to both strategy meetings and multi-agency meetings.

8.2 Attendance at Meetings

If the child is an open case to children’s social care, the meeting will be chaired by the relevant Team Manager responsible for the case, or in circumstances where the risk is high, or there is media interest, the relevant Service Manager. If the case is not open to social care the meeting will be chaired by the CSE/Missing Person’s Coordinator.

The meeting will be attended by:

  • Allocated social worker if an open case;
  • Early help worker if relevant;
  • South Yorkshire Police Missing Persons Officer;
  • Relevant workers/agencies working with the child, including school, education and Voluntary sector professionals;
  • Relevant health practitioner from a range of health providers, including school health nurses, Genito-Urinary Medicine Clinics, Community Sexual Health Clinics and CAMHS should be considered.
  • EVOLVE Duty Manager if CSE is identified as a risk and it is determined appropriate they attend;
  • Missing Team Worker;
  • Parent/carers where appropriate;
  • Police District Public Protection Unit Manager will attend meetings where there is a high level of concern around the child/young person.

Where child sexual exploitation is thought to be a presenting issue but the case is not open to the EVOLVE Team, the EVOLVE duty social worker should be invited to attend the meeting.

All partner agencies can use the Missing Screening Tool and/or the EVOLVE CSE Screening Tool to help in their contribution of the assessment of the child or young person.

8.3 Areas to Consider in a Strategy / Multi-Agency Meeting

  • Share information about the child and their family, what is known about missing incidents and any concerns and risks;
  • Identify what action has been taken by agencies so far;
  • Determine what assessments, if any, have been commenced / completed and if further assessment is required;
  • Level of harm and risk to be assessed;
  • Any risk of sexual exploitation;
  • Extent and number of episodes of the young person going missing/running away;
  • Is the young person involved in any crime;
  • Is the young person the victim of any crime;
  • Are there health issues to address (sexual health, physical, emotional);
  • Is the child or young person being bullied, including cyber bullying;
  • Is the child experiencing domestic abuse at home or in a relationship;
  • Is the child associating with a person who is a Person Posing a Risk to Children (PPRC)?
  • Is the child at risk from trafficking, honour based violence, forced marriage, FGM?
  • Is the child at risk of radicalisation?
  • Are there any specific equalities issues to be considered for the child or young person
  • Does there need to be a plan to enable the child/young person to reengage with education
  • What are the push/pull factors that need to be addressed
  • How will any issues around disclosure of abuse be managed
  • What can be put in place to avoid further episodes of the child/young person going missing/running away?
  • Determine if the child should be referred to Early Help or Child in Need for assessment;
  • Determine if there is any services the child or family should be signposted to
  • In the case of a Strategy Meeting, determine if Section 47 Enquiries should be initiated – for more information see Section 47 Enquiries Procedure.

It is the responsibility of the multi-agency meeting to complete a support plan for the child in which agencies will be clear about the level of support and services that will be offered to the child. Review arrangements will be agreed at this meeting.

If the child continues to go missing from placement and is at risk of CSE the allocated social worker can consider referring the child to the Multi-Agency Risk Management Panel (MARP) – for more information see Section 11, Multi-Agency Risk Management Panel (MARP).


9. Looked after Children

9.1 Care Planning and Review

Care plans should include a detailed assessment of the child’s needs, including the need for the provision of an appropriate placement that offers protection from harm. Where a child goes missing from a placement, a statutory review of their care plan can provide an opportunity to check that it addresses the reasons for an absence. The review should result in the development of a strategy to minimise a repeat of the missing episode. In particular, any issues relating to the vulnerability of the child to sexual exploitation, trafficking or criminal or gang involvement should be identified.

Actions to address these needs and ensure the child is kept safe should be clearly set out in the care plan. The police and other relevant agencies should be given the opportunity to contribute to the review.

If the child is looked after and aged over 9 years, the social worker should prepare a “Trigger Plan” when they become looked after. If a child does not have a “Trigger Plan” and is reported missing then a “Trigger Plan” must be produced. For more information see Section 3, Reporting a Child who is Missing or Absent.

Where a child already has an established pattern of running away, the care plan should include a strategy to keep them safe and minimise the likelihood of the child running away in the future. This should be discussed and agreed as far as possible with the child and with the child’s carers and should include detailed information about the responsibilities of all services, the child’s parents and other adults involved in the family network.

Independent Reviewing Officers (IROs) should be informed by the child’s social worker about missing and away from placement without authorisation episodes and the IRO should address these in statutory reviews.

If the child repeatedly goes missing from placement and is at risk of CSE the allocated social worker can consider referring the child to the Multi-Agency Risk Management Panel (MARP) – for more information see Section 11, Multi-Agency Risk Management Panel (MARP).

9.2 Rotherham Looked After Children Placed Out of Borough

For more information see South Yorkshire Protocol: Notification by Other Local Authorities of Looked After Children Placed in Rotherham Procedure.

When a Rotherham child is placed out of borough, the social worker must make sure that the child has access to the services they need. Notification of the placement must be made to the host authority and other specified services. The “Trigger Plan” must be sent to the host local authority alongside the Notification of Placement or Change of Placement of Looked After Children within the area of another Local Authority. The “Trigger Plan” should also be forwarded to the South Yorkshire Police Missing Investigator who will forward the document to the host Police Force for their information in case the child or young person is reported missing while they are in placement. For more information see Section 3, Reporting a Child who is Missing or Absent. When a Rotherham child placed out of borough runs away, the host local authority Regional Missing from Home and Care Protocol should be followed, in addition to complying with other processes that are specified in the policy of the responsible Local Authority.

It is possible that the child will return to the area of the responsible authority so it is essential that liaison between the police and professionals in both authorities is well managed and co-ordinated. The host Police Force should contact South Yorkshire Police for information and liaison where necessary. MASH and the allocated social worker should also be informed by the host local authority and assist in the recovery of the child where appropriate.

Agreement should be reached at time of placement as to whether the Independent Return Home interview should be conducted by the host authority, and the information sent back to Rotherham; or whether Rotherham Missing Team will conduct the RHI, working closely with the host authority.

9.3 Looked After Children from Another Area Placed in Rotherham

If a Looked After Child from another area has been placed in Rotherham, the responsible local authority should complete a Notification of Placement or Change of Placement of Looked After Children within the area of another Local Authority. This document should outline any risks associated with the child, including the risk of sexual exploitation and missing.

The Return Home Interview for a child placed in Rotherham should be conducted by the Rotherham Missing Team and the information shared with the responsible authority as soon as possible.

If the child repeatedly goes missing from placement and is at risk of CSE it is the duty of the allocated social worker from the responsible authority to use the statutory reviewing processes to address the issues. If this does not improve the outcomes for the child, the social worker can consider referring the child to the Multi-Agency Risk Management Panel (MARP) – for more information see Section 11, Multi-Agency Risk Management Panel (MARP).

9.4 Children’s Home Staff and Foster Carers

Children’s home staff and foster carers are trained and supported to offer a consistent approach to the care of children. This includes being proactive about strategies to prevent children from running away and understanding the procedures that must be followed if a child goes missing.

The National Minimum Standards specifies that staff should actively search for children and, where appropriate, work with the police.

Children’s home staff or foster carers should continue to offer warm and consistent care when a child returns, and running away should not be viewed as behaviour that needs to be punished. The need for safe and reliable care may be particularly significant for a child who faces pressure to run away from their placement as a result of circumstances beyond the control of their carers. In these circumstances, it will be even more important that the child’s care and placement plans are kept up-to-date and include a strategy to reduce the pressure on the child to run away.

9.5 Reducing the Risk of Looked After Children Running Away

Local Authorities have a duty to place a looked after child in the most appropriate placement available, subject to their duty to safeguard and promote the welfare of the child. Placing the child in an appropriate placement should help to minimise the risk of the child running away.

The care plan should include details of the arrangements that will need to be in place to keep the child safe and minimise the risk of the child going missing from their placement.

Any decision to place a child at distance should be based on an assessment of the child’s needs including their need to be effectively safeguarded. Evidence suggests that distance from home, family and friends are a key factor for looked after children running away.

Listening to a child is an important factor in protecting and minimising the chances of a child running away. The Children’s Rights Director (2012) reported that “one of the major influences of them running away is having a sense that they are not being listened to and taken seriously”, particularly about placement decisions and moves. All looked after children should be informed about their right to be supported by an independent advocate.


10. Children who Go Missing but are Not Reported to the Police

All agency practitioners should consider children who have not been reported missing to the police, but have come to an agency’s attention because they are accessing other services. There may also be trafficked children who may not have previously come to the attention of children’s services or the police. For example, the Office of the Children’s Commissioner’s report highlights that children from black and minority ethnic groups, and children who go missing from education, are less likely to be reported as missing from home. Local Authorities and the police should be pro-active in places where they believe under reporting may be more likely because of the relationships some communities, or individuals, have with the statutory services.

For more information see Children Missing from Education Procedure.


11. Multi-Agency Risk Management Panel (MARP)

The Multi-Agency Risk Management Panel (MARP) has been established in Rotherham to bring together key agencies in order to effectively tackle CSE and protect and support children at risk of, or suffering from sexual exploitation or work in the local community. It coordinates the response to the risk posed to children, at certain locations and by certain offenders, agrees disruption plans and hold agencies to account for delivery of actions to minimise risk.

On a monthly basis, the MARP considers cases where sexual exploitation is a risk indicator, for example when a child is repeatedly reported missing and may be at risk of CSE.

The MARP coordinates and enhance support and interventions for those young people that are assessed as likely or suffering significant harm through Child Sexual Exploitation including those at risk of being sexually exploited where the multi-agency plan is not effectively reducing risk. It encourages and monitors joint working to ensure that there is coordinated response. It applies pro-active problem solving to address the risks associated with victims, perpetrators and locations, taking into consideration all of the powers available to partners.

Through improved information sharing, it recognises links between key issues such as missing from home and sexual exploitation and contributes to the Child Sexual Exploitation Profile using data and information from all partners, community group, parents, families and young people to better inform services design and delivery.

For more information see Safeguarding Children and Young People from Sexual Exploitation Procedure.


Appendices

Appendix 1: Referral Pathway Flowchart for Children and Young People who are missing from Care or Home

Appendix 2: Missing Screening Tool

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